Hi-De-Hi – Louth Playgoers – Riverhead Theater

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Between Monday 12th and Saturday 17th March Louth Playgoers, at The Riverhead Theatre went back to the 1980’s, the height of TV sit-coms, not that I can remember (much!).  Hi-De-Hi was one of those shows where you got to know and love the characters, so it was with great delight that all of those wonderful stars were brought back to life by Louth Playgoers, and took us back to a time of fun and frolics on the stage.

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The show was based on the popular TV series by Jimmy Perry and David Croft and won a BAFTA as best comedy series in 1984.  For those too young to remember, and didn’t get chance to see the show at Louth, it was based around the lives of the entertainers at a fictional holiday camp, Maplins, in the late 1950’s, early 1960’s;  The ‘Yellow Coats’ were a group of  either struggling wannabe actors, or washed up has-beens.

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From the moment the cast appeared on stage, I had great fun putting the new faces to the well known names. One of the lead roles, the infamous Gladys Pugh was played by Teresa Appleton who mastered her Welsh accent beautifully; forever playing up to the boss, Jeffrey Fairbrother, brilliantly played by Andy De Renzi.

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A highlight for me had to be the Sand dance, a hilariously set dance piece by Pamela Whalley and Graham Turner, who played the couple, Yvonne and Barry Stuart Hargreaves;  Their onscreen chemistry worked a treat, a great piece of casting and even when they were joined by Ted Bovis, played by Ray Baker, in a costume not leaving much to the imagination.  Ray delighted the audience with his garish suit and larger than life character.

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The audience would never have realised that the role of Peggy Ollerenshaw, originally played by Su Pollard in the TV series, only stepped into the role at short notice when the original actress fell ill.  She did a great job, and obviously threw herself into the ditzy role of Peggy with great vigour, bringing to life that wonderful character on to the stage.  It was great to see that Su Pollard visited Louth a few days before the production to visit the Theatre, and NT Shaw of Louth, the Proud Sponsors of Louth Playgoers Hi-De-Hi, and had some photos taken with the cast.

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The whole show was great fun, and all the cast worked together to keep the audience entertained throughout.  The set was very well put together, it looked great, and I loved the clever use of the doors and overall staging. Thanks and well done to those responsible for costumes, plus the backstage crew and lighting and sound.  Director Sue Soper and Producer, John Hallam – a great job; it was a brilliant night out that kept the audience laughing from start to finish.

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Review – Avenue Q – Louth Playgoers and Blaze

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Got back late last night from a fun evening of brilliant entertainment at Louth Riverhead Theatre watching their production with Blaze of Avenue Q.

I hadn’t seen the show before and heard a few things about it;  I heard comments that it’s cheeky, it’s naughty, it’s a bit rude, it’s edgy; my nephew said its like ‘the muppets twisted sister’ or ‘Family Guy to the Simpsons’.  So I had some expectations, but nothing could have prepared me for the lovely, simple story, brilliantly observed comedy, and catchy songs that would stand up completely out of the context of the show.  Yes, it has some of those moments that if you’re not open minded, or up for a bit of naughtiness you might be shocked, but overall it’s a show that would make everyone think about our own morality and the way we all think and react about subjects that are often taboo.

So over to the show itself; imagine we’re back in Sesame Street, where we’re transported to a dingy set, a road in the US with trash cans and ‘for rent’ signs (well done to the set and backstage crew!).  In comes a recent graduate looking for cheap accommodation, no purpose in life, believing his life can’t get any worse, realising that real life isn’t what he expected, and in come the other residents who show him that in fact, most people also have bad things happening in their lives and all is not as good as it appears.

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I’m not going to give too much away of the story because for me, each song and each scene was a wonderful surprise (yes even the naughty bits!), and it wouldn’t do justice explaining the plot or the specific developments.  What I will say though, is that I was made to think, ‘what do I think about that?’, ‘am I really like that?’, ‘do I really behave in that manner?’, ‘is that what I believe?’.

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There was a cast of 9 ‘real people’ who mastered the art of being puppeteers (despite sore shoulders!) in such a way that the audience were constantly drawn to the puppet rather than the puppeteer.  They have perfected the movements, the characterisations (which I didn’t believe was even possible in a puppet!) and the transitions, where sometimes puppets were shared, all completed without the audience hardly even being aware.  And one other thing I didn’t bank on, was the fabulous voices of each individual puppet, no small feat for those managing two puppets, at a few points with one on each hand, having a conversation with themselves – pure genius – congratulations!

We’ve all got friends like ‘Bad Idea Bears’, leading us astray, a few of my friends came to mind, and we all sometime feel that other people are a bit too opinionated, but actually aren’t we all in some way?  Very strangely, there are definitely a few lessons to be learnt watching this show!

The singing was brilliant, as was the small live band supporting under the leadership of the Musical Director Jacqueline Wilson (Director of Blaze), with Alex Frost and Matthew Gidlow.  This is Rob Bishop’s musical directing debut, which he did as well as appearing in this production, with more than one puppet, and one voice to contend with, brilliant!

Cast members, in order of appearance (with their dress rehearsal puppets):

Princeton/Rob Rob Bishop

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BrianJamie Harris

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Kate Monster/Lucy the SlutHayley Wrightam

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Nicky/Trekkie MonsterSteven Greenwood

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Christmas EveHelen Sargent

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Gary Coleman/Mrs ThistletwatNikki Law

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Bad Idea BearsKennedy Gardiner and Adam Barlow

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Newcomer/Narrator/EnsembleDavid Wrightam

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The show runs from Wed 14th to Saturday 17th February, so only a couple of chances left to see this brilliant spectacle.  If you want something completely different, something to make you think, laugh and just have a great time, get your tickets now. Tickets: £12 / Under 18s £6, TheatreCard £11 / Under 18s £5

Telephone: 01507 600350
The Box Office is open for advanced booking every Monday to Saturday from 10.00am – 1.00pm.

The Riverhead Theatre
Victoria Road
Louth
LN11 0BX

Email: admin@louthplaygoers.co.uk

The Louth Playgoers Website says:

“Filled with gut-busting humour and a delightfully catchy score, not to mention puppets, Avenue Q is a truly unique show that has quickly become a favourite for audiences everywhere. Although the show addresses humorous adult issues, it is similar to a beloved children’s show; a place where puppets are friends, Monsters are good and life lessons are learned.

THIS PRODUCTION IS NOT SUITABLE FOR AUDIENCES UNDER 14 YEARS

It is safe to say that if you are an adult with a good sense of humour, then AVENUE Q is right up your street.

Is it appropriate for kids? Er, well, this is where it gets a bit fuzzy. If your teenager is mature enough to see a musical about issues such as sex, drinking, and surfing the web for porn, then they’ll probably love AVENUE Q too! Only you can judge. It’s hard to say what exact age is right to see AVENUE Q – parents should use their discretion based on the maturity level of their children. But we promise you this – if you do bring your teenagers to AVENUE Q – they’ll think you’re really cool!

Tickets: £12 / Under 18s £6
TheatreCard £11 / Under 18s £5

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Goodnight Mr Tom – Louth Playgoers Production

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I only have a vague recollection of Michelle Magorian’s children’s novel Goodnight Mr Tom from watching the film and TV series some years ago, but I do remember it being a wonderful story with sad, yet powerful moments.  Set in a little village in 1941 we see children evacuated from London.  A completely different life for some, and especially for  the little boy in ‘Mr Tom’s’ care.  The audience were taken through the transition of William to life in the country; his visit back to his difficult home in London with his negligent mother, and back to the country.  Poor little William had a lot to contend with in his short life, and things didn’t get much better when he went through further losses when back in the village.

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In my opinion Louth Playgoers have a great track record of putting on productions that audiences want to see, and this play was no exception;  they performed to nearly sell out audiences every night and justifiably so as the whole show was professional, entertaining, engaging and dramatic.  I went on the second night, Wednesday 6th December, with a few friends and family, and every one of us thoroughly enjoyed the performance.

The cast overall were brilliant and worked together really well, but I want to mention just a few individuals; I thought Tom Oakley ‘Mr Tom’, played by John Elliot was totally believable and gave a compelling performance, emotional, heartfelt and engaging.  William Beech, the young evacuee was played wonderfully by Robert Husband, I totally felt for him all the way through; he showed timidity, the difficult circumstances he’d come from and his difficult background could really be seen in how he portrayed that character.  Another standout performance for me was the role of Zacharius Wrench, played by Ben Jones.  I did hear after the show that this was Ben’s first ever performance so I can’t wait to see what he does next.  His character, exuberance and larger than life personality really shone out in every scene.

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Congratulations to the whole cast, you could feel the emotion, through both the happy and the more difficult to watch scenes and most of the audience left with more that a little tear in their eyes.

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This is the first production that Daniel Wakefield has Directed at the Riverhead Theatre; Daniel said in the programme “it was daunting… there was 18 different locations to change throughout the show”; he said he wanted to keep the set simple without the need for major set changes.  This worked really well as the set was indeed simple, but with a few changes here and there, transformed very cleverly from one location to another, keeping the story and the dialogue moving throughout. Two other elements were also brought into the show that I enjoyed; puppetry and projection; the snippets of film really transported the audience back to the time of the story; my mum certainly enjoyed re-living some of the experiences of her childhood during the second world war as she watched with me.  And although I enjoyed the puppet dog, which also worked really well, the audiences laughter as they reacted to the dog in certain emotional moments was a little distracting and a bit unnecessary.

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Well done also to the backstage crew including wardrobe and set design and build and the sound and lighting crew.  A brilliant job; and another well done to Daniel Wakefield, Director (also responsible for designing and operating the lighting)  and Laura Martin, Assistant Director.  I’ll look forward to seeing some more future performances!

To see other up coming performances at Louth Riverhead Theatre please look at their website https://louthriverheadtheatre.com for ‘What’s on’

 

The Rise and Fall of Little Voice – Louth Playgoers

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My first show of the new season, 11th – 16th September 2017 sees the current Louth Playgoers Production, written by Jim Cartwright, The Rise and Fall of Little Voice.  I knew the film fairly well so was interested to see how the Director, Jeremy Smith and the Producer, Jamie Harris translated this story onto the stage and brought to life the funny yet sad story to the stage.

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The play tells the story of a shy, reclusive girl named Little Voice and her larger than life, out of control mother Mari.

Desperately missing her dead father, Little Voice spends her time locked in her bedroom listening to his old record collection and perfecting astonishing impersonations of famous divas including Shirley Bassey, Marilyn Monroe, Judy Garland and Dusty Springfield.

When Mari starts dating small-time club agent Ray Say, she thinks he’s her last chance for a better life. When Ray Say hears Little Voice sing, he thinks she’s his ticket to the big time. Little Voice just wants a normal life and to be loved. Not everyone is going to get what they want

I actually can’t believe its 25 years since the film was made with Michael Caine, Brenda Blethyn and Jane Horrocks, and was delighted to see that the play had its own particular quirks and nuances that added a brilliant comedic effect; definitely not a copycat version of the film despite still only having 7 cast members.

Helen Crawshaw played ‘Little Voice’ and I was really impressed by her impersonations and her portrayal of shyness in the beginning and her transformation on the stage when she eventually found herself (which brought a tear to my eye); it was really well done.

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Laura Martin, who played ‘Mari Hoff’ was very funny and utterly believable as the drunken, uncaring mother, delivering her lines with clarity and great comedy and her sidekick, Yvonne Bates who played ‘Sadie May’ made a brilliant pair; their MJ disco moves were fab.  I really relished the ‘vacant, vacuum and void’ look of Sadie, what a character.  Her little personal ‘gems’ totally grossed me out if I’m honest (in a good way), but added fabulous detail to an already brilliantly played character.  I’m just glad I wasn’t the one clearing up after her!  Very well done, I can’t say you were born to play that part Yvonne but I bet that was fun.

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Derek Maher obviously had a few fans in the audience on Tuesday evening as he played ‘Ray Say’; I loved the way his character changed from Mari’s lustful lover, to showing empathy and being manipulative in equal measures with Little Voice and then turning completely, by totally humiliating Mari; he moved from one Ray to another with believable ease despite some scenes being a bit uncomfortable to watch.

It was a wonderful performance by Jack Lovett in his third venture into a dramatic role as ‘Billy’ the telephone engineer’s assistant, and love interest of Little Voice.  His ability to show sensitivity and understanding to Little Voice’s concerns and helping her to overcome them came across beautifully.  I loved the way the audience could see his emotions without him having to say a word… a complete change from other roles I’ve seen Jack play previously.

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I loved the way the set was built, and the attention to detail was very clever; I did wonder how the transition to the club scenes were going to happen with the size of the set but it was very well done (the set was Designed by Eric Cahill and Brian Disbrowe)!  I also loved the use of lighting, to highlight the different elements of the stage and set, and the changes between scenes.  It all added a great atmosphere and made the audience feel they were there in the moment, especially in the ‘club’ scenes which were very cleverly thought out and Billy’s ‘lights’ at the end.  Well done also to Gareth Bates who played a delightfully cheesy ‘Mr Boo’; I don’t think I was the only member of the audience who felt that they had gone into the wrong theatre for Act 2; the ‘Phoenix Nights’ vibe was very funny!  It was good to have live musical accompaniment too from Matthew Jeffery  on piano and Stuart Spendlow on Drums (is that really your accent Stuart?).  I must also mention the ‘Phone Man’ Andrew Milsom, he played a dual role the ‘Showbiz Agent’ looking to take ‘Little Voice’ to greater things.

The Director was Jeremy Smith who has been with Louth Playgoers for six years;  the Producer was Jamie Harris, a familiar name at Louth Playgoers, directing, producing, singing, acting and even designing lights in many productions, as well as forming his own theatre company, JAM JAR PRODUCTIONS, who are currently rehearsing for their next production, ‘Confusions’ by Alan Ayckbourn to be performed at the Riverhead Theatre in November.

Well done to the whole cast and crew; a fabulous production that I urge anyone who can make it this week before the end of the run to take the time and book your ticket, you truly won’t be disappointed.  The show runs from 11th to 16th September and tickets can be purchased from Louth Riverhead Theatre Box Office or by visiting Louth Riverhead Theatre, Victoria Road, Louth, LN11 0BX or by Telephone: 01507 600350, prices range from £4 to £8.50.
The Box Office is open for advanced booking every Monday to Saturday from 10.00am – 1.00pm.

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‘Live in Five’ – Louth Playgoers

 

19466624_10159141116900413_3020045263018780907_oWhat a great evening of fun and laughter I had last night at the very first show for this brilliant play, written by local Louth talent, Beth Raithby (who happened to be sitting in the balcony for the whole show without the audience knowing until the end – you really did deserve that applause Beth!)

Louth Playgoers described the show:

The winner of our 2016 Scratch Night, “Live in Five” written by Beth Raithby follows the hilarious SLWK News Team. Sex. Booze. Moles with socks and rogue panthers. It’s all in a day’s work. But with the Station Manager on her way and the team at loggerheads, anything could happen!
Tickets £7
Booking info: www.louthplaygoers.com or Box Office is open Mon -Sat 10am-1pm 01507 600350

Email: admin@louthplaygoers.co.uk

Phone: 01507 600350

Website: www.louthplaygoers.com

It was a pretty fast paces comedy, in which a series of very different characters, all of which were played brilliantly, all came together in the stressful environment of a back stage newsroom; directed by John Hewer, assisted by writer Beth Raithby.

There were only 8 roles, and every one of them was portrayed very well.  I loved all the characters in different ways so I’m not going to pick any of them out in particular (see the cast list and their roles below), but for them all to remember the vast amount of lines was remarkable!  Each one of them had a different persona, which regularly clashed, as you would imagine when stresses run high.  If you don’t appreciate regular use of profanities, it’s possibly not the show for you; but in my opinion the bad language was appropriate in the context of the show and not overused or deliberately offensive in any way and often added to the hilarity of the scene.

The set was very simple but effective, and I liked the use of the clock and calendar which gave the audience a sense of the lapsed time.  Even the set changes, although done in full view of the audience, despite the lowered lights, did not detract from the performance.

I applaud the whole cast for their obvious hard work in pulling together a play like this that left each cast member no room for error.  With the amount of laughter coming from the theatre – and there was a lot of it – the rest of the audience obviously thoroughly enjoyed it too.

So well done everyone – if you haven’t got tickets to see this brilliantly funny play, you have tonight and tomorrow to take advantage of the few tickets there are remaining!

Esme Blake – Station Executive – Efficient; Acerbic; Exacting – Holly Mapletoft

William Calloway – News Presenter – Charming; Charming; Even-More-Charming – James Burgess

Matt Booker – News Presenter – Brash; Belligerent; Boozer – Derek Maher

Jessica Fletcher – Floor Manager – Pragmatic; Unfazed; Focused – Kim Birchall

Heather Wilson – Weather Reporter – Commanding; Cynical; Seductive – Erica Slonskyj

Daniel Jones – Off-Site Reporter – Caring; Foolish; Absent-Minded – Daniel Wakefield

Maisie Hawthorn – Autocue Operator – Naive; Ditsy; Innocent – Lydia Reeves

Colin – Matt’s Mate – Confused; Gullible; Broke – Darren Melton

 

Thanks also to all the technical and stage crew:

Sound Design – Christoper Peters, Assistant Director – Beth Raithby, Technical Advisor – Daniel Wakefield, Lighting Operator – Bryony Plaskitt, Sound Operator – Joel Howard, Set Design – John Hewer, Bob Booth, Eric Cahill, Props – Ashley Stevens & Hambledon Productions, Costume – Hambledon Productions & Cast

 

Booking info: www.louthplaygoers.com or Box Office is open Mon -Sat 10am-1pm 01507 600350

Email: admin@louthplaygoers.co.uk

Phone: 01507 600350

Website: www.louthplaygoers.com

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Jesus Christ Superstar – Louth Playgoers – Revew by Frances Brindle

 

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I’m absolutely delighted that even though I’m still away in the USA I am able to publish a review for this great show via a wonderful friend from Louth Playgoers (LPG), Frances Brindle, for their current production of Jesus Christ Superstar, the Rock Opera, in Riverhead Theatre, Louth from 17th to 27th May.

Frances is usually onstage for the musicals but as well as performing for LPS she’s been Assistant Director, Producer and taken Choreographer roles.  She’s also on the marketing team and is on the Board of Directors. You can also find her smiley face in the box office from time to time!!!

Frances next  LPS project is Once Upon a Time, the summer concert on August 12th where she’s Producer and choreographer.

Over to you Fran…

Having not been involved in this years musical (an odd feeling!) I thought I’d embrace being on the other side and I’d review it.

Not being a massive fan of Jesus Christ Superstar, hence not being part of the show, I can’t say I wasn’t looking forward to the show, but my reason for going was to support the cast who have worked so hard to produce it.

And a huge amount of hard work has gone into it. I’ve heard first hand that there’s literally been blood sweat and tears, and that was just building the set! Bob Booth and his crew have produced the largest construction our stage has ever seen. With giant steps, platforms, trapdoors, and multi levels, the immense presence of it is the first thing you notice when the curtains go back. It is utilised in so many different ways, which I won’t spoil, but the cast are constantly all over this giant structure making full use of the dynamics this set has to offer.

The most striking thing about this show was that everyone on that stage was fully invested in it and committed to providing a great performance. It was lovely to see so many new faces on the stage too, I hope they’ve loved it enough to join us in the forthcoming season.

The wardrobe team must be congratulated for their efforts because you could quite happily believe you were in biblical times, which is no easy feat when you have to source clothes in a modern society. They were tasteful, suited and my favourite part was that there were so many colours on that stage but they weren’t super bright and they fitted the show perfectly. The use of scarves and shawls was an excellent addition to each costume and I’m sure it aided the cast in defining their characters.

Colours for me played an important role in this show, Pilate in purple typically an “evil” colour, Herod’s glamorous gold, and Judas in Red which is essentially an angry colour and in the scene where he’s fighting his inner demons under the red lighting and wearing a red costume absolutely took the audience on a journey of his mind set.

The lighting in the whole show was very atmospheric and the use of candles to create a hazy glow in certain scenes definitely worked for me. There’s something to be said for emotional scenes portrayed in the flicker of candlelight.

The show is full of strong voices but the trio of Jesus (Jody McCutcheon) Mary Magdalene (Evie Dodds) and Judas (Rik Hardenberg) carry the show along at a pace which tells the story beautifully yet keeps the audience on the edge of their seats, literally. Their performances are brilliant and all differently so emotive that towards the end of Act two my stomach was in knots and I still felt a bit shaky after the show. It’s intense, shocking, heart wrenching and emotional whilst still having moments of upbeat, lively fun.

The fun mostly comes from the ensemble who are the heart of this show. They never stop! They are constantly climbing up and down stairs and scaffolding, on and off the stage, and it’s their commitment to this merry dance that makes the story so believable. All whilst performing perfectly placed choreography (by Sarah Hagerup) remembering harmonies, singing and still managing to breathe!! Hats off too to Keith Weston, the Musical Director, because it takes an awful lot of work to accomplish a rock opera with no spoken lines and just pure singing, and it’s a hard sing! And a hard play for the band too who absolutely rock!

The concept of this show is still one I can’t get my head around, but a lady who has, is the Director, Sue Hamilton. She has had the enormous task of bringing this vision to reality. It has been done in such a way that not only works, but flows so much that a scene disappears before your eyes before you’ve had a chance to realise it’s gone. And it happens more than once!

For a show that I don’t like, tonight I loved it! I smiled, I clapped and I cried, it moved me so much!

So if between now and Sat 27th May you want a great night out then go and see Jesus Christ Superstar, because they’re all Superstars!

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There are some tickets left and you can get them at www.louthplaygoers.com or call Box Office on 01507 600350 open 10am-1pm Monday -Saturday.

Thank you Frances for taking the time to write this great review, I’m just very disappointed that I’m unable to see this show that I know and love, and that I was part of in the Lincoln Cathedral production in both 2015 and 2016 with some of the same cast as in this particular production.

I hope that all the cast and crew have a great rest of the run, and that everyone enjoys it as much as Frances obviously did!

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“The Lady in the Van” – A Louth Playgoers Riverhead Theatre Production

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When I saw that Louth Playgoers were putting on a production of “The Lady in the Van” I was really pleased to see something a bit different to the usual performances that seem to come up in local theatres.  I’d seen the film with Dame Maggie Smith last year, and loved the story, so was very interested to see how this would work in theatre.  Would there be an actual van on stage?  How would the sets work?  Well I wasn’t disappointed!

The production, Written by Alan Bennett and Directed by Susan Hewer, worked really well on stage. The set design, by John Hollingsworth was very well thought out, the little windows in Alan Bennett’s office in Camden, the garden fence (ivy included), the gate, the houses across the street, all added to the feeling of looking in on a private driveway, people watching.

Susan Hewer, in the Director’s Notes in the programme, says ‘The play is both funny and sad, provocative and uplifting, being a blend of unbelievable truths as we are drawn into Miss Shepherd’s world of experiences”  She’s right, and with the addition of the dual roles of Alan Bennett, (dressed identically, with the same mannerisms and accents) really had us drawn into his life, his feelings towards his own mam, and the way he felt about Miss Shepherd.

From the moment Linda Goodman Powell, who played Miss Shepherd, shuffled on stage in her untidy mac and Nora Batty stockings, I knew we were going to have a few laughs…  She brought ‘Miss Shepherd’ to life in her own way; beautifully portrayed mannerisms, wonderful facial expressions and brilliant accent, bouncing off both Alan Bennett’s in humour and in her own cantankerous way.  The Alan Bennett’s were played by Andy De Renzi (Alan Bennett 1) and Derek Le Page (Alan Bennett 2).  Both Alan’s did extremely well, bringing their own portrayal of either the physical or the psychological characters to life;  and considering all three main parts had seemingly hours of dialogue, monologues and soliloquies, it’s no wonder they had to receive some cue’s from the prompter (Christine Raithby) from time to time.

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I enjoyed seeing a few familiar faces on stage from previous Louth Playgoers performances, including Rufus, the neighbour played by James Burgess;  who along with his stage wife, Pauline, played by Laura Martin, really highlighted the difficulties people must have experienced when faced with this type of situation.

Alan Bennett’s mam, played by Pamela Whalley, portrayed the mam beautifully, initially a happy, caring mother, but later, more reserved and worried; she really did show the different characteristics.

I really loved the way the sound and lighting designers and operators manipulated the lighting between scenes.  The programme tells us the music in the production was from Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 27 in E minor, op. 90, Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 24 in F sharp major, op. 78 and J.S. Bach’s Mass in B minor, the Kyrie and the Gloria.  The rest of the music had been special composed by Mark-Anthony Turnage which really added a special something to the performances.

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I can’t mention everyone who was involved, but the rest of the cast did really well, especially those playing multiple roles.  Special mention must also go to the Stage Manager (and controller of The Van! – Tony Blackmore – wow ‘The Van’s’… red, and ‘crushed mimosa’ and even the mop head brush!).  Also need to say really well done for the set build, taking the set designs and making them a reality, Alan Fisher and Team.  The costumes and props also need to be highlighted; Ashley Stevens and John Hallam were responsible for the props and Barbara Vickers, Fern Garland and Pat Fisher for the costumes.  There were a few characters with a variety of costumes but Miss Shepherd’s range of outfits were brilliant…  I loved the whole look, the hats, the bags, the carriers, just her look – it was genius, well done!

Thanks for a good night out, and in the words of the lady I met at the bar before the show started who had never been to the Riverhead Theatre before, “What a beautiful theatre, and a wonderful variety of shows, we should come more often, we only live round the corner”.

There are tickets still available for tonight (Friday 14th April) and tomorrow (Saturday 15th April) so if you can, go along and support, it’s a fabulous story!

Click Here for tickets and more information on other shows coming up!

Thanks to Lesley Jane Mitchell and Jack Lovett for the photographs.

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