Hi-De-Hi – Louth Playgoers – Riverhead Theater


Between Monday 12th and Saturday 17th March Louth Playgoers, at The Riverhead Theatre went back to the 1980’s, the height of TV sit-coms, not that I can remember (much!).  Hi-De-Hi was one of those shows where you got to know and love the characters, so it was with great delight that all of those wonderful stars were brought back to life by Louth Playgoers, and took us back to a time of fun and frolics on the stage.


The show was based on the popular TV series by Jimmy Perry and David Croft and won a BAFTA as best comedy series in 1984.  For those too young to remember, and didn’t get chance to see the show at Louth, it was based around the lives of the entertainers at a fictional holiday camp, Maplins, in the late 1950’s, early 1960’s;  The ‘Yellow Coats’ were a group of  either struggling wannabe actors, or washed up has-beens.


From the moment the cast appeared on stage, I had great fun putting the new faces to the well known names. One of the lead roles, the infamous Gladys Pugh was played by Teresa Appleton who mastered her Welsh accent beautifully; forever playing up to the boss, Jeffrey Fairbrother, brilliantly played by Andy De Renzi.


A highlight for me had to be the Sand dance, a hilariously set dance piece by Pamela Whalley and Graham Turner, who played the couple, Yvonne and Barry Stuart Hargreaves;  Their onscreen chemistry worked a treat, a great piece of casting and even when they were joined by Ted Bovis, played by Ray Baker, in a costume not leaving much to the imagination.  Ray delighted the audience with his garish suit and larger than life character.


The audience would never have realised that the role of Peggy Ollerenshaw, originally played by Su Pollard in the TV series, only stepped into the role at short notice when the original actress fell ill.  She did a great job, and obviously threw herself into the ditzy role of Peggy with great vigour, bringing to life that wonderful character on to the stage.  It was great to see that Su Pollard visited Louth a few days before the production to visit the Theatre, and NT Shaw of Louth, the Proud Sponsors of Louth Playgoers Hi-De-Hi, and had some photos taken with the cast.



The whole show was great fun, and all the cast worked together to keep the audience entertained throughout.  The set was very well put together, it looked great, and I loved the clever use of the doors and overall staging. Thanks and well done to those responsible for costumes, plus the backstage crew and lighting and sound.  Director Sue Soper and Producer, John Hallam – a great job; it was a brilliant night out that kept the audience laughing from start to finish.



‘Annie’ – BOS Musical Theatre Group


The last time I saw Annie was on a family trip to the Mayflower Theatre, Southampton in November 2000 where I think (if my memory serves me – and Google is right) Lesley Joseph played Miss Hannigan and Kevin Colson was Daddy Warbucks. But on Tuesday night at the Blackfriars theatre I watched the BOS Musical Theatre Group in the same production.  I’d forgotten how many great songs come up throughout the show – including ‘Tomorrow’, ‘Easy Street’ and ‘Hard Knock Life’, I thoroughly enjoyed the performance.

To be honest I’d forgotten a lot of the story, but as one of the most successful musicals in recent years, it tells the heart warming tale of Annie’s escape in 1933 from an orphanage where the wicked Miss Hannigan rules, to start a wonderful new life with Daddy Warbucks and all the adventures she has in between.

Orphans Group 2
The orphanage

The set and all the changes at Blackfriars were very well done; we were transported from bedroom to sewing room, from street corners to shanty town then to Daddy Warbucks sumptuous mansion, to the N.B.C. Radio Studio, to the White House and around and back again.

Boylan Sisters and Bert Healey
N.B.C. Radio Studio
House Staff again 2
Daddy Warbucks Mansion

In the performance on Tuesday, Precious Stewart-Coates played Annie, and delighted the audience over and over again with her beautiful voice, her positive attitude, characterisation and infectious smile! Very well done Precious, I can see why in the programme you have now fulfilled your dream role; I’ll be watching out for future performances!  And what great fun you must have had with that gorgeous dog, I saw the effect you had telling him to stay!

Annie 2 - Precious

Natasha Connor managed to turn the audience against her, and was very believable as the evil Miss Hannigan with her powerful voice and sharp tongue and in contrast, Katy Divilly as Grace Farrell, secretary to the millionaire Oliver Warbucks, was delightfully prim and proper and showed a loving nature, and kind heart.

Miss Hannigan and Grace
Grace Farrell and Miss Hannigan

Ben Gilbert‘s Daddy Warbucks certainly won over the audience, with his warm and loving character; the perfect contrast to the fiesty Annie, a lovely match!

Annie and Daddy Warbucks 2
Daddy Warbucks and Annie

The nasty trio that was Natasha Connor as Miss Hannigan, Rob Callaby as Rooster, and Lucy Allen as Lily St Regis,  brought an element of fun to the show, with their double crossing plan, and Lily’s larger than life enthusiasm; they got their justified boo’s from the audience at the end!

Ralph and Lilly Mudge
Miss Hannigan, Rooster and Lily St Regis

It would be unforgivable for me not to mention Christian Slingsby, (one of my Jesus Christ Superstar, Lincoln Cathedral co-performers), who played a variety of characters including Bert Healy of N.B.C. Radio where he played his usual charming self and the powerful President Roosevelt.  A definite change from the last role we saw him in – ‘Into the Woods’ also at Boston, where he played one of the Princes (we’ll never forget ‘Agony’ and the shirt ripping episode! – and just for the record – we can’t wait for the next show!)

Bert Healy at N.B.C. Radio

All the cast did great and obviously had a lot of fun putting on the show; it was a very entertaining evening with a real feel good atmosphere.  There are a few more opportunities to see this show at Boston, so give it a chance, and take the family, you won’t be disappointed!  Click here for details and tickets for the remaining performances Tonight, Friday 24th at 7.30pm, Saturday 25th at 2.30pm and 7.30pm.

Well done to all the Production Team, including the Director and Producer, Stuart Bull (who says in the programme he’d prefer to be performing to directing for an easier life!)


Preview – ‘Twang’ – Hambledon Production – Riverhead Theatre Louth

Now and again, a production is on ‘for one night only’ and that is the case with ‘Twang’ from Hambledon Productions at Riverhead Theatre Louth.  It sounds like it’s going to be a fun night and hopefully this ‘preview’ will help to spread the word to encourage people to attend!


The press release said:

 Be One of the First to See the World Premier of
Lionel Bart’s Hidden Musical Gem

Local professional theatre company ‘Hambledon Productions’ (the team behind recent nationwide hits ‘Steptoe and Son’ and ‘Just Like That! The Tommy Cooper Show’) are back in the area for an unmissable performance of a musical comedy from one of the country’s most popular composers.

Created by Lionel ‘Oliver!’ Bart, this swinging-60s rumbustious retelling of the Robin Hood legend failed to ignite the public and critics upon its first production in 1965, despite including the likes of Barbara Windsor and Ronnie Corbett among the cast list. Bart reportedly lost all his fortune on the show and his score, although being heralded as one of his best, has slipped into obscurity.

John Hewer, local playwright and co-founder of Hambledon Productions, has resurrected the score and written a brand new accompanying libretto for a one-night-only spectacular at the Riverhead Theatre in Louth. “It was one of those extremely lucky moments,” says John, “when the Lionel Bart Estate granted permission for me to revive this mistakenly-neglected show. The score is a wonderful mix of traditional Lionel Bart, fused with a real 60’s-jazz vibe.” When quizzed about the new script, John added, “I’ve allowed my book to be completely influenced by Bart’s score and have created what I believe to have been Bart’s original intention – for a sort of “Carry On Robin Hood” comedy, telling an innuendo-fuelled story of the folklore legend and his more-than-merry men, through catchy numbers, broad slapstick and plenty of one-liners.”

John, who has previously written the popular spoofs “STOP!… You’re Killing Me” and “A Fistful of Spaghetti” as well as numerous pantomimes, will be joined on stage by a local cast of talented performers and a live orchestra.

“This is a truly remarkable event,” he said. “The fact that Hambledon will be the first company to be launching Bart’s score to a new generation for the first time in over 50 years is simply astounding. Tickets are selling extremely quickly with Lionel Bart fans and musical theatre fans booking from far and wide. It’s certainly one to catch.”


TICKETS: £12.00

CALL: 01507 600350



Click here for Tickets – Louth Riverhead Theatre


Mad About the Musicals – M A Promotions – Louth Riverhead Theatre


Billed as ‘Songs from the Greatest Shows of the West End and Broadway’; Mad About the Musicals was certainly a feast of Musical Theatre, with a mixture of well known favourites and lesser known delights.  The show, part of a UK tour, features Michael Courtney, from Lincoln; Jai McDowall, from Scotland and winner of Britain’s Got Talent in 2011; Rosanne Priest from near Sheffield, and Kerry Whiteside from Lancashire.


The cast were supported by a wonderful live band, and despite only 4 members, Musical Director Michael Lovelock on Keys 1; Marc Hayes on bass guitar (who I believe was also part of the orchestra for the Lincoln Cathedral Production of Jekyll and Hyde in August 2017); Rich Craig on drums and percussion and Josh Weaver on Keys 2.

Some of the early numbers included Don’t Rain on my Parade from Funny Girl, and songs from Little Shop of Horrors and Song and Dance, but one of my favourites from the whole show was ‘This is the Moment’ from Jekyll and Hyde.  Having recently seen the Lincoln production (mentioned above) it was wonderful to hear an alternative live version of the powerful ballad, and Jai’s rendition was beautiful.


Act 1 ended with songs from Phantom of the Opera, Cabaret, then a medley of a number of musical favourites melded together wonderfully.


Act 2 started with a lovely medley from Chicago and then some numbers one of my favourite musicals, Evita.  Rosanne Priest gave a stunning performance of Don’t Cry for Me Argentina which was a highlight for me.


After a feast of other great musical theatre power ballads, including I Know Him So Well from Aspects of Love and Love Changes Everything from Chess, we were delighted with ‘It Sucks to be Me’ from Avenue Q, puppets included!

The whole show was brought together with some brilliant compering from Michael Courtney who linked the numbers with some funny comedy lines; breaking up the music with great banter.  The audience were thrilled with the whole show, and they weren’t left disappointed with the finale of a brilliant Les Miserables medley.

Vocals from all performers were spot on, the sound and mic balance was just right and the lighting effects all added to the professional performance.

There are tickets left for this evening if you are near to Louth and want to take advantage of a wonderful night of song; click here Louth Riverhead Theatre or visit:

Box Office

Telephone: 01507 600350
The Box Office is open for advanced booking every Monday to Saturday from 10.00am – 1.00pm.

The Riverhead Theatre
Victoria Road
LN11 0BX

Email: admin@louthplaygoers.co.uk

For details of the whole UK Tour visit Mad About the Musicals



(Photos from Mad About the Musicals Facebook Page)




The Rise and Fall of Little Voice – Louth Playgoers


My first show of the new season, 11th – 16th September 2017 sees the current Louth Playgoers Production, written by Jim Cartwright, The Rise and Fall of Little Voice.  I knew the film fairly well so was interested to see how the Director, Jeremy Smith and the Producer, Jamie Harris translated this story onto the stage and brought to life the funny yet sad story to the stage.


The play tells the story of a shy, reclusive girl named Little Voice and her larger than life, out of control mother Mari.

Desperately missing her dead father, Little Voice spends her time locked in her bedroom listening to his old record collection and perfecting astonishing impersonations of famous divas including Shirley Bassey, Marilyn Monroe, Judy Garland and Dusty Springfield.

When Mari starts dating small-time club agent Ray Say, she thinks he’s her last chance for a better life. When Ray Say hears Little Voice sing, he thinks she’s his ticket to the big time. Little Voice just wants a normal life and to be loved. Not everyone is going to get what they want

I actually can’t believe its 25 years since the film was made with Michael Caine, Brenda Blethyn and Jane Horrocks, and was delighted to see that the play had its own particular quirks and nuances that added a brilliant comedic effect; definitely not a copycat version of the film despite still only having 7 cast members.

Helen Crawshaw played ‘Little Voice’ and I was really impressed by her impersonations and her portrayal of shyness in the beginning and her transformation on the stage when she eventually found herself (which brought a tear to my eye); it was really well done.


Laura Martin, who played ‘Mari Hoff’ was very funny and utterly believable as the drunken, uncaring mother, delivering her lines with clarity and great comedy and her sidekick, Yvonne Bates who played ‘Sadie May’ made a brilliant pair; their MJ disco moves were fab.  I really relished the ‘vacant, vacuum and void’ look of Sadie, what a character.  Her little personal ‘gems’ totally grossed me out if I’m honest (in a good way), but added fabulous detail to an already brilliantly played character.  I’m just glad I wasn’t the one clearing up after her!  Very well done, I can’t say you were born to play that part Yvonne but I bet that was fun.




Derek Maher obviously had a few fans in the audience on Tuesday evening as he played ‘Ray Say’; I loved the way his character changed from Mari’s lustful lover, to showing empathy and being manipulative in equal measures with Little Voice and then turning completely, by totally humiliating Mari; he moved from one Ray to another with believable ease despite some scenes being a bit uncomfortable to watch.

It was a wonderful performance by Jack Lovett in his third venture into a dramatic role as ‘Billy’ the telephone engineer’s assistant, and love interest of Little Voice.  His ability to show sensitivity and understanding to Little Voice’s concerns and helping her to overcome them came across beautifully.  I loved the way the audience could see his emotions without him having to say a word… a complete change from other roles I’ve seen Jack play previously.


I loved the way the set was built, and the attention to detail was very clever; I did wonder how the transition to the club scenes were going to happen with the size of the set but it was very well done (the set was Designed by Eric Cahill and Brian Disbrowe)!  I also loved the use of lighting, to highlight the different elements of the stage and set, and the changes between scenes.  It all added a great atmosphere and made the audience feel they were there in the moment, especially in the ‘club’ scenes which were very cleverly thought out and Billy’s ‘lights’ at the end.  Well done also to Gareth Bates who played a delightfully cheesy ‘Mr Boo’; I don’t think I was the only member of the audience who felt that they had gone into the wrong theatre for Act 2; the ‘Phoenix Nights’ vibe was very funny!  It was good to have live musical accompaniment too from Matthew Jeffery  on piano and Stuart Spendlow on Drums (is that really your accent Stuart?).  I must also mention the ‘Phone Man’ Andrew Milsom, he played a dual role the ‘Showbiz Agent’ looking to take ‘Little Voice’ to greater things.

The Director was Jeremy Smith who has been with Louth Playgoers for six years;  the Producer was Jamie Harris, a familiar name at Louth Playgoers, directing, producing, singing, acting and even designing lights in many productions, as well as forming his own theatre company, JAM JAR PRODUCTIONS, who are currently rehearsing for their next production, ‘Confusions’ by Alan Ayckbourn to be performed at the Riverhead Theatre in November.

Well done to the whole cast and crew; a fabulous production that I urge anyone who can make it this week before the end of the run to take the time and book your ticket, you truly won’t be disappointed.  The show runs from 11th to 16th September and tickets can be purchased from Louth Riverhead Theatre Box Office or by visiting Louth Riverhead Theatre, Victoria Road, Louth, LN11 0BX or by Telephone: 01507 600350, prices range from £4 to £8.50.
The Box Office is open for advanced booking every Monday to Saturday from 10.00am – 1.00pm.







Once Upon a Time – Louth Playgoers – 12 August 2017


The first show I ever went to see at Louth Riverhead Theatre was ‘Musical Memories’ as I’d just started to get to know some of the performers from the Lincoln Cathedral Production of Jesus Christ Superstar in 2015.  I was so overwhelmed with the talent in that particular show that when I saw that there was going to be ‘Once Upon a Time’ featuring songs from our favourite family films I couldn’t resist.

Once upon a Time was Directed by Jamie Harris who has directed several of the shows I’ve enjoyed at the same theatre, and the Musical Director Keith Weston who I also have enjoyed work from.  Frances Brindle and Derek Smith were the Producers and I have to say I thoroughly enjoyed the production.

Derek Smith was a complete natural as our host for the evening and kept the audience interest as he relayed details about Disney and the other films, and I particularly enjoyed his first number with the children, ‘Heigh-Ho’; what a delight to see Derek getting right in with the kids performing the 1937 Disney Classic from Snow White.  It was wonderful to see the small children enjoying participating around the stage and the theatre.

A few highlights for me include another Derek Smith number, this time performed with his son Toby, where they had great fun with the favourite from the 1967 Disney film, Jungle Book, The Bare Necessities.  Kerry Ward did a great job as Mary Poppins, with her rendition of Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious performed with Ruairidh Greig, a perfect crowd pleaser, followed by A Spoonful Of Sugar from Janine Walker, another really lovely performance.

Laura Harris delighted us with Colours Of The Wind from Pocahontas followed immediately by Jamie Harris who sang Alan Menken’s Out There from Hunchback of Notre Dame – he brought an absolutely beautiful song to another level!

A favourite film from my sons childhood was Space Jam in 1996, and Joel Browne, with the cast, uplifted the whole audience in Act 2 with I Believe I Can Fly. Although I enjoyed the whole production, Love Is An Open Door performed by Charlotte Bushell and Jack Lovett was another highlight.  Taken from Disney’s Frozen, 2013 its become a worldwide favourite and both Jack and Charlotte brought a whole lot of fun, comedy and romance to the performance, great characterisation and wonderful musicality.

Finishing the show with a Despicable Me 2 favourite, Happy, Sunny Williamson, Molly Carter & the cast brought the song to life on the stage with the audience really wanting to sing along, with the final performance from the whole cast of When You Wish Upon a Star ending the show with a rapturous applause from the whole audience.

There were quite a few young children in the audience which all seemed to be delighted with the great variety of films and musicals the songs represented, keeping the adults entertained with some of the older favourites.  A couple of older teens sitting near me delighted in singing along to just about every performance which although nice to see, got a little frustrating when they were nearly singing as loud as those on stage!




Details of the show:


‘Be Our Guest’ (Neil Warne, Vanessa Allison & cast)

‘Heigh-Ho’ (children)

‘I’ve Got No Strings’ (Madeleine Barnes-Browne, Theresa Appleton, Beth Raithby, Poppy Barnes-Browne)

‘Cruella De Vil’ (Ed Mapletoft)

‘The Bare Necessities’ (Derek Smith and Toby Smith)

‘Supercali’ (Kerry Ward, Ruairidh Greig & cast)

‘Spoonful Of Sugar’ (Janine Walker)

‘Feed The Birds’ (Janet West & cast)

‘Somewhere Out There’ (Melissa Jenney, Ian Cahill & cast)

‘Part Of Your World’ (Katie Graham)

‘Beauty And The Beast’ (Helen Riley)

‘Friend Like Me’ (Neil le Sueur & tappers)

‘Love Survives’ (Natasha Connor)

‘I Stand Alone’ (James Burgess)

‘They Live In You’ (Helen Riley, dancers & cast)

‘Can You Feel The Love Tonight’ (Charlotte Bushell & Ben Browne)

‘Circle Of Life’ (Chris Driffield & cast)


‘Mine, Mine, Mine’ (Derek Smith, James Burgess & cast)

‘Colours Of The Wind’ (Laura Harris)

‘Out There’ (Jamie Harris)

‘I Believe I Can Fly’ (Joel Browne & cast)

‘Rumour In St Petersburg’ (cast)

‘When You Believe’ (Katie Graham & Evangeline Dodds)

‘I’m A Believer’ (Michelle Scott & cast)

‘What If?’ (Erin Ramsay)

‘Holding Out For A Hero’ (Sarah Hagerup & cast)

‘Happy Little Working Song’ (Natasha Connor)

‘Mother Knows Best’ (Kim Burchall)

‘In Summer’ (James Burgess)

‘Love Is An Open Door’ (Charlotte Bushell & Jack Lovett)

‘Let It Go’ (Evangeline Dodds)

‘Happy’ (Sunny Williamson, Molly Carter & cast)

‘When You Wish Upon A Star’ (cast)



Director – Jamie Harris

Producers – Frances Brindle & Derek Smith

Stage Manager – Bob Booth

Sound Design – Brooke Vickers

Sound Operator – Ash Hagyard

Musical Director – Keith Weston

Choreography – Frances Brindle & Jamie Harris

Lighting Design – Jamie Harris

Lighting Operator – Peter Hall

Follow Spot Operators – Martyn Underdown & McKenna Smith

Musical Mayhem – Stardust – Thursday 3rd August – Walesby Village Hall


I really had no idea that the concert I was invited to attend by my good friend Dawn Wilson was anything other than an evening of songs from the musicals until I arrived and realised that the youngsters taking part all had a common interest – Stardust

James, Alice, Emily, Emily, Martha, Rosy and Stephenson were the performers and did a fantastic job of entertaining the sell out audience with their renditions of songs from popular musicals and shows, a lot of the songs I recognised and loved, while others were less well known but equally enjoyable.  I recognised at least one of the team, Stephenson, who had performed in a show I’d seen previously, The Lion, the witch and the wardrobe – Lincoln Minster School.


The group had obviously worked hard on the programme, choosing a great variety of music, showing comedy, romance as well as showcasing all their individual talents, they obviously all had a great time performing, as much as the audience, and I, loved their performances.


The pianist did a fabulous job with some of the accompaniment, and also a lovely solo piece, and Charles Cooper behind the curtain manning the music and backing tracks also did a great job, thankfully he got his chance to join the team on stage at the end for his well earned bow!

The whole show was professional and its fabulous to see such great talent in our local community.  I for one, can’t wait to see where these young people end up – I’m sure we’ll be watching some of them performing on much bigger stages in the years that come.  Well done to all!

Here’s their full names to watch out for them…  Alice Joyce, Emily Bland, Emily Zehetmayr, Martha Stewart, Rosy Smith, Stephenson Catney and James Sprague

I believe across both the matinee and evening performance raised a fabulous £1,010 and an NCS coffee morning the day after in Louth raised £460. There was also a sponsor for the event, NFH Consultancy Ltd so now have £2,165 and are able to offer all 15 students selected a fully funded place this term!


For those that may not have heard of Stardust before, here’s some background information:

More than 11 million people in the UK are classified as disabled; figures made up primarily of adults over the age of 65, but also including children and young adults, who for one reason or another, face more day to day obstacles than the average person. While suitable education and extracurricular groups are often accessible for under 19’s with additional needs, choices are limited for young adults. Sara Sprague, a Lincolnshire mother, certainly found this to be the case when her daughter, Brianna, recently left school to begin her adult life in the community. In this unique story, you will see how Sara, Brianna and her family challenged the odds, and their relentless determination has shown that they are far more than just a statistic.

Following her first performance in “Peter Pan” Brianna became an active member of the Lincoln theatre group New Youth Theatre from the age of six, where she had the freedom to express herself through song and dance, despite being non-verbal for many years. A brain injury at just three days old limited Brianna’s development, and although she was just months behind her peers hitting milestones as an infant, the gap soon began to show. Access to equine therapy allowed Brianna to walk at two and a half, but when she began to fall behind her peers significantly, her parents discovered ‘FISDAC Academy’ which enabled her to continue with her love of musicals, whilst also being able to accommodate Brianna’s additional needs.

Unfortunately, the effects of puberty caused Brianna to suffer up to fifteen epileptic seizures each day, but by the age of sixteen they had increased to over 100. The inability to socialize or even achieve an enjoyable quality of life could later have become detrimental to her mental health, had Sara not begun to look for alternatives. The organisation “Chicken Shed”, a ‘fully inclusive’ theatre group looked ideal but was based in London, while the only similar, existing groups in Lincolnshire ran only as evening classes, and so were inaccessible to Brianna, as her epilepsy limits her to just a few hours of activity each day.

In 2014, Brianna joined St Francis School in Lincoln, which was equipped to cope with her additional needs in a safe environment, allowing her to reach her full potential. Through the school Brianna was able to participate in more theatre productions, even taking on main roles as her confidence grew, but in 2016 concerns were raised about how the young people could continue their passion for drama upon leaving school. Discussions with parents, Rachel Pavitt and Jo Slack, around the issue inspired Sara to formulate plans for a unique theatre group in Lincolnshire, specifically for young people ages 18-25, with additional needs, enabling Brianna and her peers to maintain their love for musicals and performing.

Quickly, the idea began to become a reality, and with fund raising events organised, and huge support from the Lincolnshire charity “Every-one”, the goal for STARDUST was to start sessions in September 2017. The unique organisation will be able to provide for up to 15 students per term, running from 9:50am-12:15pm on Thursday mornings, at St Francis school, with the sessions delivered by ‘New Youth Theatre’. STARDUST is built on the ethos of ‘Inclusion, Creativity, Positivity, Choice’, but funding is still desperately needed in order to deliver these sessions, as well as providing similar classes on weekends and in other areas of the country in the future.

On top of basic care needs, extra-curricular groups like STARDUST are a vital resource for these young people, as well as their carers. A local NCS group are currently working to raise awareness of the social issues around young adults in this instance, as well as raising funds for the new drama group. Organisations like STARDUST provide an essential and valuable safe haven for young adults like Brianna; in an environment where they can meet and make friends, while enjoying a shared passion for singing, dancing and performing, as well as the sense of achievement that comes with it. If you would like to be a part of making this dream a reality, contact stardust@every-one.org.uk

The group have found their song which epitomises their ethic and really tells the story of what they’re all about – they ended the performance with this rousing rendition!