Review – Avenue Q – Louth Playgoers and Blaze

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Got back late last night from a fun evening of brilliant entertainment at Louth Riverhead Theatre watching their production with Blaze of Avenue Q.

I hadn’t seen the show before and heard a few things about it;  I heard comments that it’s cheeky, it’s naughty, it’s a bit rude, it’s edgy; my nephew said its like ‘the muppets twisted sister’ or ‘Family Guy to the Simpsons’.  So I had some expectations, but nothing could have prepared me for the lovely, simple story, brilliantly observed comedy, and catchy songs that would stand up completely out of the context of the show.  Yes, it has some of those moments that if you’re not open minded, or up for a bit of naughtiness you might be shocked, but overall it’s a show that would make everyone think about our own morality and the way we all think and react about subjects that are often taboo.

So over to the show itself; imagine we’re back in Sesame Street, where we’re transported to a dingy set, a road in the US with trash cans and ‘for rent’ signs (well done to the set and backstage crew!).  In comes a recent graduate looking for cheap accommodation, no purpose in life, believing his life can’t get any worse, realising that real life isn’t what he expected, and in come the other residents who show him that in fact, most people also have bad things happening in their lives and all is not as good as it appears.

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I’m not going to give too much away of the story because for me, each song and each scene was a wonderful surprise (yes even the naughty bits!), and it wouldn’t do justice explaining the plot or the specific developments.  What I will say though, is that I was made to think, ‘what do I think about that?’, ‘am I really like that?’, ‘do I really behave in that manner?’, ‘is that what I believe?’.

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There was a cast of 9 ‘real people’ who mastered the art of being puppeteers (despite sore shoulders!) in such a way that the audience were constantly drawn to the puppet rather than the puppeteer.  They have perfected the movements, the characterisations (which I didn’t believe was even possible in a puppet!) and the transitions, where sometimes puppets were shared, all completed without the audience hardly even being aware.  And one other thing I didn’t bank on, was the fabulous voices of each individual puppet, no small feat for those managing two puppets, at a few points with one on each hand, having a conversation with themselves – pure genius – congratulations!

We’ve all got friends like ‘Bad Idea Bears’, leading us astray, a few of my friends came to mind, and we all sometime feel that other people are a bit too opinionated, but actually aren’t we all in some way?  Very strangely, there are definitely a few lessons to be learnt watching this show!

The singing was brilliant, as was the small live band supporting under the leadership of the Musical Director Jacqueline Wilson (Director of Blaze), with Alex Frost and Matthew Gidlow.  This is Rob Bishop’s musical directing debut, which he did as well as appearing in this production, with more than one puppet, and one voice to contend with, brilliant!

Cast members, in order of appearance (with their dress rehearsal puppets):

Princeton/Rob Rob Bishop

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BrianJamie Harris

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Kate Monster/Lucy the SlutHayley Wrightam

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Nicky/Trekkie MonsterSteven Greenwood

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Christmas EveHelen Sargent

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Gary Coleman/Mrs ThistletwatNikki Law

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Bad Idea BearsKennedy Gardiner and Adam Barlow

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Newcomer/Narrator/EnsembleDavid Wrightam

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The show runs from Wed 14th to Saturday 17th February, so only a couple of chances left to see this brilliant spectacle.  If you want something completely different, something to make you think, laugh and just have a great time, get your tickets now. Tickets: £12 / Under 18s £6, TheatreCard £11 / Under 18s £5

Telephone: 01507 600350
The Box Office is open for advanced booking every Monday to Saturday from 10.00am – 1.00pm.

The Riverhead Theatre
Victoria Road
Louth
LN11 0BX

Email: admin@louthplaygoers.co.uk

The Louth Playgoers Website says:

“Filled with gut-busting humour and a delightfully catchy score, not to mention puppets, Avenue Q is a truly unique show that has quickly become a favourite for audiences everywhere. Although the show addresses humorous adult issues, it is similar to a beloved children’s show; a place where puppets are friends, Monsters are good and life lessons are learned.

THIS PRODUCTION IS NOT SUITABLE FOR AUDIENCES UNDER 14 YEARS

It is safe to say that if you are an adult with a good sense of humour, then AVENUE Q is right up your street.

Is it appropriate for kids? Er, well, this is where it gets a bit fuzzy. If your teenager is mature enough to see a musical about issues such as sex, drinking, and surfing the web for porn, then they’ll probably love AVENUE Q too! Only you can judge. It’s hard to say what exact age is right to see AVENUE Q – parents should use their discretion based on the maturity level of their children. But we promise you this – if you do bring your teenagers to AVENUE Q – they’ll think you’re really cool!

Tickets: £12 / Under 18s £6
TheatreCard £11 / Under 18s £5

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‘Annie’ – BOS Musical Theatre Group

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The last time I saw Annie was on a family trip to the Mayflower Theatre, Southampton in November 2000 where I think (if my memory serves me – and Google is right) Lesley Joseph played Miss Hannigan and Kevin Colson was Daddy Warbucks. But on Tuesday night at the Blackfriars theatre I watched the BOS Musical Theatre Group in the same production.  I’d forgotten how many great songs come up throughout the show – including ‘Tomorrow’, ‘Easy Street’ and ‘Hard Knock Life’, I thoroughly enjoyed the performance.

To be honest I’d forgotten a lot of the story, but as one of the most successful musicals in recent years, it tells the heart warming tale of Annie’s escape in 1933 from an orphanage where the wicked Miss Hannigan rules, to start a wonderful new life with Daddy Warbucks and all the adventures she has in between.

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The orphanage

The set and all the changes at Blackfriars were very well done; we were transported from bedroom to sewing room, from street corners to shanty town then to Daddy Warbucks sumptuous mansion, to the N.B.C. Radio Studio, to the White House and around and back again.

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Daddy Warbucks Mansion

In the performance on Tuesday, Precious Stewart-Coates played Annie, and delighted the audience over and over again with her beautiful voice, her positive attitude, characterisation and infectious smile! Very well done Precious, I can see why in the programme you have now fulfilled your dream role; I’ll be watching out for future performances!  And what great fun you must have had with that gorgeous dog, I saw the effect you had telling him to stay!

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Annie

Natasha Connor managed to turn the audience against her, and was very believable as the evil Miss Hannigan with her powerful voice and sharp tongue and in contrast, Katy Divilly as Grace Farrell, secretary to the millionaire Oliver Warbucks, was delightfully prim and proper and showed a loving nature, and kind heart.

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Grace Farrell and Miss Hannigan

Ben Gilbert‘s Daddy Warbucks certainly won over the audience, with his warm and loving character; the perfect contrast to the fiesty Annie, a lovely match!

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Daddy Warbucks and Annie

The nasty trio that was Natasha Connor as Miss Hannigan, Rob Callaby as Rooster, and Lucy Allen as Lily St Regis,  brought an element of fun to the show, with their double crossing plan, and Lily’s larger than life enthusiasm; they got their justified boo’s from the audience at the end!

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Miss Hannigan, Rooster and Lily St Regis

It would be unforgivable for me not to mention Christian Slingsby, (one of my Jesus Christ Superstar, Lincoln Cathedral co-performers), who played a variety of characters including Bert Healy of N.B.C. Radio where he played his usual charming self and the powerful President Roosevelt.  A definite change from the last role we saw him in – ‘Into the Woods’ also at Boston, where he played one of the Princes (we’ll never forget ‘Agony’ and the shirt ripping episode! – and just for the record – we can’t wait for the next show!)

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Bert Healy at N.B.C. Radio

All the cast did great and obviously had a lot of fun putting on the show; it was a very entertaining evening with a real feel good atmosphere.  There are a few more opportunities to see this show at Boston, so give it a chance, and take the family, you won’t be disappointed!  Click here for details and tickets for the remaining performances Tonight, Friday 24th at 7.30pm, Saturday 25th at 2.30pm and 7.30pm.

Well done to all the Production Team, including the Director and Producer, Stuart Bull (who says in the programme he’d prefer to be performing to directing for an easier life!)

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Preview – ‘Twang’ – Hambledon Production – Riverhead Theatre Louth

Now and again, a production is on ‘for one night only’ and that is the case with ‘Twang’ from Hambledon Productions at Riverhead Theatre Louth.  It sounds like it’s going to be a fun night and hopefully this ‘preview’ will help to spread the word to encourage people to attend!

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The press release said:

 Be One of the First to See the World Premier of
Lionel Bart’s Hidden Musical Gem

Local professional theatre company ‘Hambledon Productions’ (the team behind recent nationwide hits ‘Steptoe and Son’ and ‘Just Like That! The Tommy Cooper Show’) are back in the area for an unmissable performance of a musical comedy from one of the country’s most popular composers.

Created by Lionel ‘Oliver!’ Bart, this swinging-60s rumbustious retelling of the Robin Hood legend failed to ignite the public and critics upon its first production in 1965, despite including the likes of Barbara Windsor and Ronnie Corbett among the cast list. Bart reportedly lost all his fortune on the show and his score, although being heralded as one of his best, has slipped into obscurity.

John Hewer, local playwright and co-founder of Hambledon Productions, has resurrected the score and written a brand new accompanying libretto for a one-night-only spectacular at the Riverhead Theatre in Louth. “It was one of those extremely lucky moments,” says John, “when the Lionel Bart Estate granted permission for me to revive this mistakenly-neglected show. The score is a wonderful mix of traditional Lionel Bart, fused with a real 60’s-jazz vibe.” When quizzed about the new script, John added, “I’ve allowed my book to be completely influenced by Bart’s score and have created what I believe to have been Bart’s original intention – for a sort of “Carry On Robin Hood” comedy, telling an innuendo-fuelled story of the folklore legend and his more-than-merry men, through catchy numbers, broad slapstick and plenty of one-liners.”

John, who has previously written the popular spoofs “STOP!… You’re Killing Me” and “A Fistful of Spaghetti” as well as numerous pantomimes, will be joined on stage by a local cast of talented performers and a live orchestra.

“This is a truly remarkable event,” he said. “The fact that Hambledon will be the first company to be launching Bart’s score to a new generation for the first time in over 50 years is simply astounding. Tickets are selling extremely quickly with Lionel Bart fans and musical theatre fans booking from far and wide. It’s certainly one to catch.”

SATURDAY 25TH NOVEMBER, 7.30PM
RIVERHEAD THEATRE, LOUTH

TICKETS: £12.00

CALL: 01507 600350
WWW.LOUTHRIVERHEADTHEATRE.COM

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Click here for Tickets – Louth Riverhead Theatre

Twang!!

Once Upon a Time – Louth Playgoers – 12 August 2017

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The first show I ever went to see at Louth Riverhead Theatre was ‘Musical Memories’ as I’d just started to get to know some of the performers from the Lincoln Cathedral Production of Jesus Christ Superstar in 2015.  I was so overwhelmed with the talent in that particular show that when I saw that there was going to be ‘Once Upon a Time’ featuring songs from our favourite family films I couldn’t resist.

Once upon a Time was Directed by Jamie Harris who has directed several of the shows I’ve enjoyed at the same theatre, and the Musical Director Keith Weston who I also have enjoyed work from.  Frances Brindle and Derek Smith were the Producers and I have to say I thoroughly enjoyed the production.

Derek Smith was a complete natural as our host for the evening and kept the audience interest as he relayed details about Disney and the other films, and I particularly enjoyed his first number with the children, ‘Heigh-Ho’; what a delight to see Derek getting right in with the kids performing the 1937 Disney Classic from Snow White.  It was wonderful to see the small children enjoying participating around the stage and the theatre.

A few highlights for me include another Derek Smith number, this time performed with his son Toby, where they had great fun with the favourite from the 1967 Disney film, Jungle Book, The Bare Necessities.  Kerry Ward did a great job as Mary Poppins, with her rendition of Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious performed with Ruairidh Greig, a perfect crowd pleaser, followed by A Spoonful Of Sugar from Janine Walker, another really lovely performance.

Laura Harris delighted us with Colours Of The Wind from Pocahontas followed immediately by Jamie Harris who sang Alan Menken’s Out There from Hunchback of Notre Dame – he brought an absolutely beautiful song to another level!

A favourite film from my sons childhood was Space Jam in 1996, and Joel Browne, with the cast, uplifted the whole audience in Act 2 with I Believe I Can Fly. Although I enjoyed the whole production, Love Is An Open Door performed by Charlotte Bushell and Jack Lovett was another highlight.  Taken from Disney’s Frozen, 2013 its become a worldwide favourite and both Jack and Charlotte brought a whole lot of fun, comedy and romance to the performance, great characterisation and wonderful musicality.

Finishing the show with a Despicable Me 2 favourite, Happy, Sunny Williamson, Molly Carter & the cast brought the song to life on the stage with the audience really wanting to sing along, with the final performance from the whole cast of When You Wish Upon a Star ending the show with a rapturous applause from the whole audience.

There were quite a few young children in the audience which all seemed to be delighted with the great variety of films and musicals the songs represented, keeping the adults entertained with some of the older favourites.  A couple of older teens sitting near me delighted in singing along to just about every performance which although nice to see, got a little frustrating when they were nearly singing as loud as those on stage!

 

 

 

Details of the show:

ACT ONE

‘Be Our Guest’ (Neil Warne, Vanessa Allison & cast)

‘Heigh-Ho’ (children)

‘I’ve Got No Strings’ (Madeleine Barnes-Browne, Theresa Appleton, Beth Raithby, Poppy Barnes-Browne)

‘Cruella De Vil’ (Ed Mapletoft)

‘The Bare Necessities’ (Derek Smith and Toby Smith)

‘Supercali’ (Kerry Ward, Ruairidh Greig & cast)

‘Spoonful Of Sugar’ (Janine Walker)

‘Feed The Birds’ (Janet West & cast)

‘Somewhere Out There’ (Melissa Jenney, Ian Cahill & cast)

‘Part Of Your World’ (Katie Graham)

‘Beauty And The Beast’ (Helen Riley)

‘Friend Like Me’ (Neil le Sueur & tappers)

‘Love Survives’ (Natasha Connor)

‘I Stand Alone’ (James Burgess)

‘They Live In You’ (Helen Riley, dancers & cast)

‘Can You Feel The Love Tonight’ (Charlotte Bushell & Ben Browne)

‘Circle Of Life’ (Chris Driffield & cast)

ACT TWO

‘Mine, Mine, Mine’ (Derek Smith, James Burgess & cast)

‘Colours Of The Wind’ (Laura Harris)

‘Out There’ (Jamie Harris)

‘I Believe I Can Fly’ (Joel Browne & cast)

‘Rumour In St Petersburg’ (cast)

‘When You Believe’ (Katie Graham & Evangeline Dodds)

‘I’m A Believer’ (Michelle Scott & cast)

‘What If?’ (Erin Ramsay)

‘Holding Out For A Hero’ (Sarah Hagerup & cast)

‘Happy Little Working Song’ (Natasha Connor)

‘Mother Knows Best’ (Kim Burchall)

‘In Summer’ (James Burgess)

‘Love Is An Open Door’ (Charlotte Bushell & Jack Lovett)

‘Let It Go’ (Evangeline Dodds)

‘Happy’ (Sunny Williamson, Molly Carter & cast)

‘When You Wish Upon A Star’ (cast)

 

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Director – Jamie Harris

Producers – Frances Brindle & Derek Smith

Stage Manager – Bob Booth

Sound Design – Brooke Vickers

Sound Operator – Ash Hagyard

Musical Director – Keith Weston

Choreography – Frances Brindle & Jamie Harris

Lighting Design – Jamie Harris

Lighting Operator – Peter Hall

Follow Spot Operators – Martyn Underdown & McKenna Smith

‘Wizard of Oz’ – LAODS – Guest Review – Jordan Leith

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Thank you Jordan for writing and allowing me to share your review.  Having stayed in Kansas for the last 3 weeks, I’m totally disappointed not to have been back to see this show, but thankfully I at least have a glimpse into the fun that this show brought.

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After seeing LAODS (Lincoln Amateur Operatic and Dramatic Society) bring Spamalot to the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre last year, I was optimistic for this year’s production of The Wizard of Oz, and was not disappointed. The company brought the land of Oz to life fantastically, paying tribute to the classic well-loved story, whilst also making the performance relative for a modern-day audience.

The show opens in weary Kansas and Dorothy Gale (Natalie Rowe) sings a beautiful rendition of Somewhere Over The Rainbow, the song which traditionally paints the picture of Dorothy as a country girl from the ranch with her head in the clouds, constantly dreaming of better but never doing anything about it. However, Natalie Rowe’s performance developed Dorothy beyond just a damsel in distress, creating more interesting character development and a worthy moral at the show’s conclusion. The director also chose to add a subtle reference to “friends of Dorothy” which was both amusing and a pleasing nod to the legacy of the performance within the gay community.

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After creating a thrilling storm, Dorothy, her house, and her dog, Toto (Daisy), are transported to the colourful land of Oz, turning the stage into a vivid contrast from Kansas. The sudden madcap world of Oz, with munchkins, witches, and talking trees, was portrayed with the wicked sense of humour I have come to expect from LAODS. An outstanding display of comic delivery came from the Scarecrow (Jim Burrows) who brought instant delight with his clumsy tumbling around the stage. Another highlight was the Lion (Andy Morris), charming the audience at every possible moment, and stealing the stage as the dandy lion in every song. Together with the Tinman (Jamie Chatterton), the four leads had an excellent rapport and the friendships felt very real. Every scene between them kept a quick pace and the dialogue and humour between them flowed effortlessly.

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A mention must also be given to Sian-Elizabeth Rees for her portrayal of the wicked witch, a villain we love to hate. She made a menacing foe for the heroes whilst also having a sharp wit, which made her presence missed whilst off-stage. Accompanying her performance was an impressive amount of pyrotechnics to create a stunning supernatural villain. There were various technical elements that brought the show together and although there were a couple of wobbles likely due to the complexity and this being the opening performance of the run, they were all covered smoothly and didn’t take anything away from the show.

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There was also an opportunity for younger children (and big kids) to get photos with the characters after the show to make for a memorable experience. Ultimately it is excellent to see an amateur dramatic group putting on a musical and demonstrating the time and effort of creating a fun-filled show purely because they enjoy it. The enjoyment shines through the performance and altogether, the intricate costumes, the colourful set design, and witty performances created a delightful feel-good show, leaving everyone beaming and skipping home via the yellow brick road.

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The show is on at the LPAC until Saturday 17th of June. Tickets can be bought online by clicking here or at the box office along with the official programme

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‘Made in Dagenham’ – Lincoln College Performing Arts Students  – Guest Review – Dawn Wilson

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Thank you Dawn for taking the time to write a review for this show – it’s definitely one I would have made an effort to get to see so thank you!

Matinee 9th June 2017

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Having a day off meant that I was able to attend the matinee of ‘Made in Dagenham‘ performed by the 2nd year Performing Arts students of Lincoln College.  I have seen this show before when it was performed by a youth group in Spalding, Lincolnshire, and was excited to see how a slightly older cast would handle it.

A very brief synopsis of the show is that it is based on the true story of the female workers at the Dagenham ford plant who find that their jobs are to be downgraded to “unskilled” and later find that they are paid less than their male  counterparts for the same job.

Set in 1968, it tells the story of Rita O’Grady who finds a strength she didn’t know she had, to lead the women in the fight against the might of Ford; but would it come at the expense of her home life, in particular her relationship with her husband Eddie?

From the opening number, ‘busy woman’ we see the domestic Rita, holding her family together, before heading off to work.  That first number set the bar very high for the rest of the show; Rita’s voice sang out and when joined on stage by the rest of the women, the harmonies were perfect – and indeed remained perfect throughout. This is surely testament to the work of the musical directors Lisa Cowley and Lee Harvey and indicative of the hard work that the students had obviously put in. Having been in, and seen lots of shows, I fully appreciate that when the adrenaline of performance kicks in, it is sometimes at the expense of the harmonies – certainly not a problem with this talented cast!

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I am not sure if there was an issue with some of the mikes, but some of the dialogue did get lost in places and the band, whilst note perfect, were a little loud.

The musical numbers in the show ranged from the rousing ‘Made in Dagenham’ and ‘Everybody Out‘ to the tender ‘I’m sorry I love you‘ and ‘The Letter‘ to the wonderful ‘America’ complete with cheerleaders and Marilyn Monroe , an almost Donald-Trump-like ode to the UK!

The struggle that Rita faced as her battle took her to Westminster is surely faced by every single working mum up and down the country; Rita missed her son’s music concert and battled with the guilt. Rita was played beautifully by Rebekah Bowen, strong, feisty and funny, yet vulnerable and insecure.

Joel Gibson who played Eddie O’Grady, Rita’s husband, had just the right mix of being “one of the lads” to baring his soul in the tender song ‘The Letter‘, and he also played out the struggle between wanting to support his wife, wanting his home life to be perfect and trying to stand up to the same factory lads who struck out at him for not “controlling his wife” when they were laid off; another complex role handled really well.

The factory girls Sandra, Beryl, Claire and Connie were brought to life with  humour and some rather fruity language.

Other great performances included Natalie Rowe as the steely Barbara Castle. Natalie must be one of the busiest actors  in Lincoln at the moment as she opens as Dorothy in LAODS ‘Wizard of Oz‘ next week at the LPAC, juggling such different roles is testament to the talent that this young lady possesses.

For me the line of the show belongs to Harold Wilson, when asked if he had ever seen a she lion bring down a wildebeest his response “I’m from Huddersfield” showed a real comic timing from Barrie Howard, however for me personally the portrayal of the gruff northern prime minister was a little too camp.

The set was simple but effective, but some of the scene changes, whilst done efficiently by the backstage crew could probably have been made slicker by the use of trucks, but no doubt budget constraints (the bane of most productions) prevented this.

This production, the choreography, the music, the lighting , the use of the entire stage,  the casting , its entirety, was just wonderful from the opening note to the final note.  It was a shame that they didn’t perform to a larger audience, but whilst we may have been small in numbers we were huge in our appreciation.

Well done Lincoln College, it was a privilege to see this production, and it goes to show that Lincoln really does have talent in bucketloads. Former students of this course have gone onto drama schools and indeed Michael Dyer won the prestigious Andrew Lloyd Webber scholarship to study at the Laine Theatre School so we really are seeing the future stars of stage and screen right here.

I would also like to add that I thought that the direction of the show was spot on. This show has focuses on very adult themes; the struggle to juggle relationships and work being just one, and the director Jenni Bagnall has done a wonderful job coaxing some incredible performances from  young performers – I was able to forget that I was watching a “college” show and just enjoy it for what is was, great theatre.

To know that Jenni not only directed but also choreographed this show is incredible, two very demanding roles. The choreography was just right for this show, at no point did the stage feel “crowded” and the cast seemed to be enjoying every single second, again a testament to the hard work that has gone in. I was looking around the various performers and could not see even one who seemed to be concentrating on the steps at the expense of performance.

I must also give credit to the tech team, the lighting was subtle and effective, even when using the extremities of the stage, thanks to Andy Whitehouse & the LPAC Tech Team!

To  have put so much work into this production for just three “performances” seems a real shame, but as I said earlier, I loved this show and would have no hesitation in recommending future productions of this creative team, they clearly instil a professionalism in their cast which is to be applauded.

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Thanks to Dawn Wilson for this fabulous review, and well done to all the cast and crew!

‘Fun Home’ – Kauffman Centre for the Performing Arts

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For my second show review during my visit to the USA and Canada this time I’m in Kansas and had the privilege to visit the Kauffman Centre for the Performing Arts and see the award winning musical, Fun Home.  The musical is based on Alison Bechdel’s best-selling graphic memoir and is the winner of five 2015 Tony Awards® including Best Musical.  I’d only read a few snippets about the story and hadn’t heard of it before, but had been advised to buy tickets as it has been a very popular show on Broadway and now on tour.

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One of the things that struck me about this show was how different it was from anything I’d ever seen before.  It’s absolutely not your typical ‘happy clappy’ fun and happy ending kind of a musical – we had moments of laughter but moments of shock and extreme sadness…  we saw into the lives of an American family, torn apart by a dictatorial, controlling father, who is owner of a funeral parlour (nick named Fun Home) and an English Teacher, who loved books.

 

It was really interesting to see Bruce, Alison’s father’s life, open up in layers, over the years, whilst ‘Alison’ watched on as her adult self, reminiscing about her childhood and the happy times she had with her father.  We saw Alison ‘grow’ physically, with her role being played by small, medium and adult Alison; and growing in both learning about herself and in looking back, reflecting on choices she’d made, discussions she had, and wondering ‘what if’.  We saw her coming to a sense of self realisation and in sharing those intimate moments with the audience gave us very special and brilliantly portrayed scenes using both word and movements.

It was both thought provoking and a beautiful insight into family life and all the good and bad that comes from an uncomfortable level of dysfunction all brought together with clever, witty dialogue, using repetitive, rhythmic poetry and song, with the inclusion of some lyrics in a kind of semi-spoken verse.

I loved the music; the live band at the back of the stage were discrete, yet wonderfully powerful at times; the lyrics and movement of both characters and stage set were very cleverly composed and carried out.  I loved the use of the walls, furniture and intelligent lighting; it all set the mood perfectly, especially in some of the more poignant scenes.

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I can completely understand how this musical has won so many awards; the vocal score was brilliant and there was a couple of absolute stand out moments for me through the show.  “Come to the Fun Home” – John, Christian & Small Alison, the ‘siblings’, played by Henry Boshart, Luke Barbato Smith and Carly Gold were fantastic, the dancing the vocals and the choreography – they pulled it off with magnificence – well done!!

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What a way to end a show – very atypical of musical theatre, we ended with “Flying Away (Finale)” – Alison, Medium Alison & Small Alison.  A triumph of a trio, their voices blended in fabulous harmony, they sang with heartfelt emotion and I was physically moved.  Congratulations Kate Shindle, Abby Corrigan and Carly Gold, you were a sensation!

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If you get the opportunity to see this show while it’s on tour, I would highly recommend it, tickets are available from now until December 2017 in various US States with additional tour dates to be announced soon.

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